Music/Popular Culture

Tournament of Rock – Legends: Led Zeppelin vs Pink Floyd

The results: Nobody saw it coming when the tournament began, but everybody saw it coming entering the Great 8, I’ll bet. So now we know – one of the four greatest artists of all time is Neil Young. The numbers: #5 Neil Young 62%; #2 The Clash 38%. NY is into the Final Four.

Up next, our search for the greatest Baby Boomer band of all time takes you to the Fillmore region. Hold still – this is going to sting a little.

#1 Led Zeppelin: Listen #2 Pink Floyd: Listen

<br /> <a href=”http://answers.polldaddy.com/poll/2293783/” mce_href=”http://answers.polldaddy.com/poll/2293783/”>Which band/artist deserves to advance in the Tournament of Rock: Legends?</a><span style=”font-size:9px;” mce_style=”font-size:9px;”>(<a href=”http://answers.polldaddy.com” mce_href=”http://answers.polldaddy.com”>polls</a>)</span><br />

Polls close Monday morning.

The updated bracket looks like this:

Image credit: Dillsnap Cogitations and Virgin Media.

33 replies »

  1. NY knocking off The Clash was wrong. But it’ll be even more wrong if he knocks out either The Police or the Stones.

    I went with Floyd here. Dark Side of the Moon, The Wall, Wish You Were Here – all awesome albums. I’ve lost count of the number of bands who tried to become the next Pink Floyd (all of which failed miserably, IMO). I don’t get the same “often imitated, never exceeded” vibe from Zeppelin.

    Even if that weren’t the case, though, I probably would have voted for Floyd over Zeppelin if for no other reason that Floyd is one of the few bands I can point to positively as having a direct influence on my own life. There’s not much music I can absolutely identify that way (and it’s not all rock&roll), but Floyd is one of them.

  2. If either one of these artists had been in Red Rocks they would have beaten all other entries in that region, instead U2 was ranked well above where they deserved and now we have to eliminate one of the greatest bands ever to get the final four. This is the hardest choice so far in the entire contest and I will need to think on it for a bit.

  3. U2 way above where they deserved, huh? Okay, I’ll bite. What critical considerations lead you to offer up this assertion about a band that was unarguably the greatest band in the world for a decade or so?

    And “I don’t like them” is not a critical consideration.

  4. Wow. Judging solely by the ineffable “F factor,” I’ve only got two horses left in this race – and neither one of them is Sting, by the way. This is going to hurt.

  5. I don’t dispute U2 blonged in this contest, maybe as a 4 or 5 seed but Sam’s contention that they were the greatest band for a decade I don’t agree with nor judging by the votes in thic contest do many others. If Pink Floyd had been seeded 1 in Red Rocks we wouldn’t have Neil Young headed into the final four where I agree he does not belong but none of the entries in the Red Recks region with the possible exception of Queen deserve to be there. BTW Sam I know you think Bono spews Sunshine and Honey out his arse but that doesn’t make it reality and this contest should show you that many others hold U2 as being as overrated as I do.

  6. Rho, I think that U2 is overrated, but for a while there they were one of the greatest bands in the world. I don’t think they defined the 80s or Xer music or anything like that grand, but there was a period in the early 80s when they ruled the radio and where they could do no wrong.

    So while I think that Sam may have put them too high (#1 seems excessive to me, but I don’t claim to have as much music knowledge as Sam and Jim do by a long shot), they probably didn’t deserve to be any lower than #3 from Joshua Tree and Under a Blood Red Sky alone. And they did a lot before that and have done more since.

  7. Brian: Yes, they did – I’m not honestly sure Joshua Tree is more than their THIRD best CD. By all means, folks, sit down and give War, Unforgettable Fire and Boy a few deep, serious listens.

    Rho: As for your sense of U2’s place in history, let’s put this conversation on hold for the moment. I believe you have some forthcoming remarks on The Beatles that will make my rebuttal a lot easier.

  8. This is tough, and I listen to Zep a whole lot more the Floyd, and I know Zep inspired a ton of bands, plus I love John Paul Jones new band Them Crooked Vultures, but I think I have to go with Floyd here because what they did was just so original. This is the toughest one so far.

    • D: This is another of those “no wrong answer” matches. A great case can be made for either band, although I tipped very slightly toward Floyd because of their enduring influence. When I look around at the most vibrant new music being made, I see PF all over the place – I can’t imagine how a genre like shoegaze evolves without Floyd’s atmospherics, for instance, and that particular genre has given us some of the best music that’s been made over the past 15 years or so.

      Of course, Zep changed everything in ways that influenced zillions of artists, too, so I know there’s a great counter-attack to my argument….

  9. Zeppelin was a very talented group of musicians, and they made some great music. Pink Floyd, on the other hand, was not only a very talented group of musicians, but also a very talented group of artists, and I think that that’s the key difference between the two. Had to go with Floyd.

  10. My gut says U2 is overrated. My ears say otherwise. A lot of bands I hear coming up these days get nods from Joy Division, Echo, et al, but I’m hearing a lot of U2, whether the bands would admit to it or not. While I don’t like them much, they have several fists full of memorable songs and their influence is just starting to fruit.

    As i said before, this isn’t a round robin. The top 4 do not represent the best 4; only those who managed to win their brackets. In theory, #1 is the only one that should be true.

    That said, I’m ashamed of those who voted for Led Zeppelin in this one. A great jam band, sure. But they’re probably already further than they deserve. Dr. Slammy is having fun calling this the boomer hall of fame, but Zep has almost no resonance in Gen-X. Pink probably has more resonance with X than they did with boomers. Why is this so close?

  11. That Floyd/Xer relationship is something I’ve noticed, and it’s a big part of the reason why I think that their importance grows as time passes while other Boomer legend bands perhaps wane a bit. When we saw that Live 8 reunion show, the response to Floyd was staggering. I wondered at the time whether a hypothetical Beatles reunion would be as big a deal today.

    • The Who v Floyd is pretty apples and oranges, although I’m the last guy you’ll hear taking anything away from them. It’s hard to even know how to compare these bands. PF is a narcotic while The Who is an angel dust cocktail. And The Who’s influence has always been over the top – they’re there in everything from power pop to garage. But I don’t get the sense that they’re as important for audiences as Floyd is. Maybe I’m wrong on that, but it seems to me like Floyd is still very present and immediate even for younger audiences whereas The Who is of the past.

  12. You might be right about the greater appeal of Floyd to younger audiences. But part of the Floyd mystique, I think, is the split, and this was the first time they were back together in decades. I think that had something to do with the anticipation for them that night–and the fact that Gilmour had made it clear it was a one-shot deal, no matter what Roger Waters said. I think it’s more that everyone knew this would be the only chance ever to see Floyd, whereas The Who will keep touring (as they have, in fact).

  13. I don’t know, Wuf. I wonder if you have the cause and effect backwards. I’d been sensing a massive PF surge for some time before that reunion, although there’s no doubt that the whole one-night-only situation put it over the top.

    In any case, can see either of these bands winning and I won’t feel bad either way. I felt like there were probably 11 or 12 bands that deserved #1 seeds and both of these groups are on that list.

  14. Well, for what it’s worth, I voted for Floyd, partly because I still listen to them, and partly because the one and only time I saw Zep they only played for an hour and a half, and 45 minutes of that was a Bonham drum solo. Pah.

  15. fikshun has this about right – and I respect and value his insights highly because he’s a fine musician himself.

    This entire contest has been about Xers attitudes towards rock history. It is about Xer insights into rock’s great artists – and their biases toward these artists, too.

    All this invoking of Boomers and THEIR attitudes and biases is so much smoke screen, so much use of straw men. This tourney has been about Xers.

    So when fikshun says Pink Floyd resonates more with Xers, he’s articulating the obvious, profound though he sounds in noting this.

    Consider this, for a moment:

    The transition from the “British Invasion/teeny bopper idol” period (roughly 1963 – 1966) of rock history to the “arena rock period” (roughly 1972-1980) might easily be called the “festival period.” The majority of the stars who emerged during this period (The Who, Jimi Hendrix, Joe Cocker, Janis Joplin, Santana, Led Zeppelin, et al) all share a common characteristic – high energy performance designed to reach the farthest reaches of a festival audience. In all these cases this is powered by sublime musicianship blended near perfectly with great showmanship.

    The Beatles’ greatest tactical mistake (and the tragedy of their career) as this transition was taking place was retreating to the studio (withal their raising the rock album to art form) and refusing to take the stage (despite entreaties and offers of piles of cash that would take one’s breath away) and showing audiences that they could play as well as their contemporaries. While Boomers certainly were dazzled by studio wizardry, they valued equally, perhaps more, live musicianship. Hence the great success of festivals and the evolution towards arena rock (and all its eventual excess).

    The bands who emerged as the major stars of the “progressive rock” movement of the late 60’s/early 70’s (Pink Floyd, Yes, Emerson, Lake, and Palmer) found ways to use the rapidly improving performance technology of their times to reach arena audiences. While this impressed Boomer audiences, Boomers have a bias toward musicianship (see above). Truth be told, many Boomers would have rated these bands in the following order based on the live musicianship criterion(within their times):

    1) ELP; 2) Yes; 3) Pink Floyd.

    Consider this:

    Many Boomers would rate Queen as high or higher than ELP, certainly higher than PF. Queen’s live musicianship matched their recording wizardry. But they were such boundary hoppers as to be almost irrelevant to the discussion here.

    Xers, much younger, in most cases too young to attend concerts to any significant degree during either the festival or arena rock periods, made most of their decisions based on how studio wizardry (at which Pink Floyd excelled) impressed them. And the album that made PF’s career DARK SIDE OF THE MOON, is a (perhaps THE) model of studio wizardry.

    Consider this:

    Two bands massively popular with Xers are tributes to their bias toward studio wizardry. Those bands? Boston (the obvious choice) and Kiss (the not so obvious one). For many Xers, their first important concert experience was seeing one of these bands. Many of these Xers saw Boston as able to deliver on their studio promise – but realized that studio technology masked some ugly truths about Kiss….

    So while Boomers privilege live performance ability equally (but as different experience) to studio wizardry, Xers have the bias of privileging live performance that mimics the studio wizardry they imprinted on. The evolution of entire sub-genres like shoe gazer and space rock comes from their attempts to play live what they heard Pink Floyd do in the studio. This they have (with the help of music tech advances) been able to do in some cases brilliantly – and I salute their contribution to rock.

    But speaking as a Boomer – and, if only by my own claim, a very knowledgeable one because of my own background as a professional rock musician – I believe that Xers over rate Pink Floyd’s greatness – and under rate Led Zeppelin’s. I saw Zep twice – and both times they kicked ass and took names. I saw Floyd once – and it was a study in technology – impressive as it was.

    I’ve said earlier in a comment that I see PF’s songwriting (particularly Waters) as over rated. I certainly don’t see it as as good as Page/Plant’s. While PF’s studio wizardry is indeed impressive, I don’t see it as more impressive than that of Page and Jones. And live Zep was only surpassed by the greatest live band of all time, The Who. Pink Floyd is more in line with The Eagles – technically perfect, but somewhat sterile.

    So I voted for Led Zeppelin.

    • Well, this comment contains some yes and some no, I imagine. Let’s see.

      This entire contest has been about Xers attitudes towards rock history. It is about Xer insights into rock’s great artists – and their biases toward these artists, too.

      What a counterintuitive observation. And, best I can tell, wrong. According to Quantcast (and I’m not sure how they arrive at these numbers, but they seem about right) S&R has more Boomer readers than Xers. I can’t prove who votes and who doesn’t vote, but the idea that all these results are about Xer opinions doesn’t appear to be supported by any evidence I can think of. We’ve had Boomers pissing all over the idea that any great music has been made since the dawn of the New Wave, though, and I think if we could afford a good reader poll we’d see that while Xer views on Boomer artists have been important, that dynamic falls WAY short of defining the ToR in the way that you assert.

      Xers, much younger, in most cases too young to attend concerts to any significant degree during either the festival or arena rock periods, made most of their decisions based on how studio wizardry (at which Pink Floyd excelled) impressed them. And the album that made PF’s career DARK SIDE OF THE MOON, is a (perhaps THE) model of studio wizardry.

      This is probably true. The music world was once about recording the live experience. At some point the live show became about reproducing the album. I’m tempted to put my finger on ELO’s New World Record tour here, for all kinds of reasons. But in any case, the shift commenced sometime around Revolver and was complete by about 1974.

      Two bands massively popular with Xers are tributes to their bias toward studio wizardry. Those bands? Boston (the obvious choice) and Kiss (the not so obvious one). For many Xers, their first important concert experience was seeing one of these bands. Many of these Xers saw Boston as able to deliver on their studio promise – but realized that studio technology masked some ugly truths about Kiss….

      This argument works perfectly if – and only if – Gen X lasted about three years. Kiss, especially, rocketed to stardom and ceased to matter in a very short period of time. So at best this describes the first two years of X. Also, re Kiss, I’d argue that it only describes working class Xers.

      The evolution of entire sub-genres like shoe gazer and space rock comes from their attempts to play live what they heard Pink Floyd do in the studio. This they have (with the help of music tech advances) been able to do in some cases brilliantly – and I salute their contribution to rock.

      While this is accurate, it does leave out an important piece – which is what happened when you then tried to translate what you’d been doing live back into the studio. Not an argument, just an observation.

      But speaking as a Boomer – and, if only by my own claim, a very knowledgeable one because of my own background as a professional rock musician – I believe that Xers over rate Pink Floyd’s greatness – and under rate Led Zeppelin’s. I saw Zep twice – and both times they kicked ass and took names. I saw Floyd once – and it was a study in technology – impressive as it was.

      I don’t know. Even if I buy that we overrate Floyd (and I don’t), I think you’re dead wrong that we underrate Zep. Zep was MASSIVELY more important than Kiss or Boston, for instance, and their importance lasted a lot longer. All the Xers I know still see Zep as Rushmore-worthy (who would be the four artists on Mt. Rockmore, I wonder?) and even in the current contest you don’t see Xers dogging them. They’re getting incredible amounts of respect, and I think that’s typical of Xers early and late.

      I’ve said earlier in a comment that I see PF’s songwriting (particularly Waters) as over rated. I certainly don’t see it as as good as Page/Plant’s.

      This is hysterical. I’ve heard you abuse Robert Plant more times than I can count. You used to quote Dave Fucking Marsh on how bad his lyrics were. On the other hand, Floyd’s lyrics were ambitious efforts to chronicle a variety of social contexts. So who are you and what have you done with the real Jim Booth?

  16. I’ve said earlier in a comment that I see PF’s songwriting (particularly Waters) as overrated.

    Yes. Like listening to a very bright, very articulate fourteen-year-old who was forced to read Animal Farm and Lord of the Flies over his summer break and HAS HAD A REVELATION.

    On the other hand, Floyd’s lyrics were ambitious efforts to chronicle a variety of social contexts.

    Exactly. Like a very bright, very articulate fourteen-year-old who read… oh.

    I love it when everyone agrees.

  17. went with zepplin w/iin about an hour of the vote opening, i think.

    it was hard. i LOVE “the wall.” i recognize that “dark side” was genius, but it’s always been “the wall” that hit me hardest. even before i saw the movie (i didn’t even understand the movie the first time i saw it).

    but zepplin just kills me every time i hear anything off the first four albums. i still find myself thinking “holy shit, this is freakin’ good” as if i hadn’t already had that thought a thousand times before.

  18. Jim, I don’t disagree with your assessment, but I think I look at it a bit differently. Pink Floyd is definitely more from the Beatles school of rock. When the Beatles retreated from touring to begin work on Sgt. Pepper’s, the argument was that they were tired of the endless touring. While I think that may have been true, I think the unspoken truth is also that the Beatles couldn’t keep up with the changing face of live rock ‘n’ roll.

    Could you picture George Harrison jumping up on stage and doing the windmill? I could picture John tucking the body of his Rick between his legs, and thrusting the neck of the guitar out at the audience as he ripped off a raw, nasty solo, but not in the context of the Beatles. They shared microphones on backing vocals. They huddled together on the Ed Sullivan stage. Visually, they were about unity. While John and Paul had insatiable egos, that wasn’t part of the public persona. That was buried beneath the “we’re just four happy lads from Liverpool” visual mystique.

    With bands like the Who and LZ, the bigger the stages got, the better they fared. They were all lead musicians who needed the extra space to prowl around and execute their wild stage antics. In fact, before the moniker “heavy metal” came into common usage, my dad said they called what the Who and LZ did “body music”. They made music to move your body to, plain and simple.

    The Beatles, and later Floyd, were doing something entirely different. Psychedelia was about moving the mind (in theory). I don’t think the Beatles or Floyd relied on the technology, but they used it as another instrument to further their mind music. For Floyd, the live show couldn’t be about standing around and playing trippy music. It had to be visual and it had to be over the top, but it wasn’t going to happen with jumping around and setting instruments on fire. They explored the medium from the perspective of a mind-music band.

    So, really for me, this comes down to the apples and oranges argument of “which do you value more? music you can move to or music for your mind?” The reason LZ doesn’t resonate much any more is that the X-er generation started the transformation of humans into creatures of thought. We don’t jam. We don’t improvise. We sit at computers all day. We execute programs. We’re completely out of touch with our bodies. We don’t dance. We don’t exercise. We dropped out of sport. We’re a generation of over-caffeinated diabetics who push zeros and ones back and forth to one another.

    The Boomer generation was about the physical act of protesting against the government. After the Viet Nam War, the government recognized the value of controlling information. War shouldn’t be seen unfiltered on the evening news. People can’t protest against what they’re not aware of. Now it’s become a bit more of an abstract game of the invisible multi-national corporations vs. the blogosphere. It’s not physical anymore.

    To me, that’s why Floyd resonates. It’s about the world-weary truths of the human condition; the knowledge that you can’t change anything forever and that any tangible change starts in a mind, not in a body. Perhaps Pink Floyd doesn’t say as much in their music, but maybe their music gives the listener’s mind the space necessary to make that leap.

    As for Kiss being about studio wizardry, I laughed a little at that. Destroyer, their one early foray into studio album rock, is one of the least Kiss-like albums in their catalog. They immediately rebelled against it and went back to their old system for subsequent albums. To listen to the typical Kiss studio album is to listen to a band trying to spend as little time and money in the studio as possible, banging out as many takes as possible. They were the furthest thing from a studio rock band.

    Speaking of Rock Band, have you played the Beatles Rock Band game? It’s visually stunning. It does a lot to reinvent the fab four as a more Floyd-like creature.

  19. The reason LZ doesn’t resonate much any more is that the X-er generation started the transformation of humans into creatures of thought. We don’t jam. We don’t improvise. We sit at computers all day. We execute programs. We’re completely out of touch with our bodies. We don’t dance. We don’t exercise. We dropped out of sport. We’re a generation of over-caffeinated diabetics who push zeros and ones back and forth to one another.

    Interesting. Maybe this is why I prefer Led Zeppelin. Maybe this is also why I’m intensely irritated by the insistence on “Xers are this, Boomers are that.”

    When I work, I create with my hands and eyes to physically manipulate fiber and metal and clay and paint. I improvise every moment, whether it’s outcome or method or both, and when I teach there is a difference in venue and materials, but very little in the sheer volume of constant experimentation. A good classroom is a laboratory and in mine I rarely sit. In private life I dance, and do other things, hard and completely in the moment. I value technology when it helps me do what I already want to do. Wii “sports” horrify me. I look at the ground when I’m walking to see what’s down there. I know where the subterranean rocks are in my garden.

    So I don’t think it’s only about body versus mind; it’s about damn good body music versus second-rate mind music. World-weary is so… easy. It’s a first step, maybe, and good if it jumpstarts other people’s thinking, but lyrically that’s where Pink Floyd seemed to get stuck. I’m an Xer; I’m a harsh critic of navel-gazing. It’s our natural metier.

  20. Ah, response. Some right, some oh so wrong….

    Sam: Plant v. Waters – I’ll choose the opening lines from the most famous song from the most famous albums by each band:

    Plant: “There’s a lady who’s sure/All that glitters is gold/And she’s buying a stairway to heaven….”

    Waters: “Money/Get away/Get a good job with more pay and you’re okay….”

    Never said Plant wasn’t awful – just that he was better overall than Waters – this may be saying one pile of shit stinks a little less than another, I admit….

    As for your claims about my claims about Xers and Boomers – do you actually read the comments in these threads? I can’t speak to the Boomer/Xer data Quantserv offers – and neither can you – I can and did make inferences from commentary here in these threads – most of which comes from Xers….

    fikshun: I think you’re under estimating The Beatles. Yes, that unity thing you speak of is there – at least in one interpretation of their nonverbal behavior. But we’re talking about the guys who developed their “mak show” on the Reeperbahn in Hamburg’s red light district – and who had to do the “smarten up” to suit Epstein…. Imagine them released from that as they were in that brief shining moment atop 3 Savile Row….

    As for your “mind/body” dichotomy – there’s more at work there than just intellect v. physicality. The Beatles gave us SGT. Pepper, to be sure, but whole chunks of THE WHITE ALBUM and ABBEY ROAD are body music. As always, The Fabs did both apples and oranges well…. 😉

    Ann: as always, you slay me…. 🙂

    • Jim: Even if the majority of the commentariat has been comprised of Xers, I don’t think we can make the same assumption about voters generally. Take away me, Darrell, Tom and fikshun, for instance, and you’ve knocked out a lot of the comments, but that’s just four votes.

  21. The comment threads may have been about Xer’s attitudes to Boomer rock but not the voting. If anything, the Xers have been giving their own bands short shrift in the voting. That’s not surprising to me. The title of the tournament is “legends”. I have a feeling that many Xers are not voting for their favorite bands, but those they consider most legendary. Obviously, Boomer bands are what we heard from our parents/uncles/older siblings. (E.g. i owned the majority of the Beatles catalog before age 5 and can still sing just about every song they wrote.) Many of the boomer bands are of near mythological importance to Xers and younger.

    Of course, Boomers are immune to straw men and smoke screens. They don’t have opinions…only unassailable facts, even on subjective matters of taste. That is, Boomers are of mythological importance to themselves. (Or, everything else that was to come from the Boomers fizzled out in hypocrisy so the great tunes are about all they have left.)

    Iron Maiden only received 2% of the vote when they came up; this tournament is not about Xers if Maiden can be completely ignored.

    I was raised on Boomer rock, and while there have only been a few bands in this tournament that i haven’t heard of (and a few more that i’ve heard of but never really heard), there haven’t been more than 10 that i would actually listen to on anything like a regular basis…certainly no more than that that i would pay money for. I only had a couple of dogs in this fight, and for the most part they were ignored or ridiculed. But take all this with a grain of salt; i’d rather listen to Fela Kuti or Pfunk than most of these bands so i’m obviously an idiot.

  22. An interesting discussion that I have nothing much to contribute to as a boomer who doesn’t listen to much X-er music. I’m just an old fart who hasn’t listened to anything new for the past three decades.

    On why the Beatles stopped touring, though, here’s a thought–Lennon and McCartney started playing together in 1957, and Harrison joined them in 1958 (at age 14!). That’s five or six years of non-stop band playing (including Liverpool and Hamburg, and wherever else they could get a gig) before the Stones, PF, or The Who even got together–and about 10 years before Zep got started. That’s a lot of touring back in the days when touring was actually hard, stages and audiences were small, technology was primitive and the music was mostly American R&B. And something no other band in the TOR (since the second round, anyway) can lay claim to. And if you listen to the first two albums, before they really hit their stride as songwriters, you can hear what a tight, working rock and roll band they really were, even though none was a great instrumentalist. So maybe they were just tired. Or maybe they just decided they couldn’t do the music in their heads on stage. Or maybe it was Yoko. It’s history now. But no one should doubt what a good rock band they were, in addition to everything else they became, before anyone else in this TOR even got together.

    And I will go listen to Fela Kuti, Lex. Can’t say I was impressed by Pfunk, but I’ll give it another try. My favorite group of all time, btw, is Startled Insects–and I couldn’t even begin to tell you what kind of music they played.

  23. Wufnik,

    Pfunk is a band of eras (and a tangled history). Really early it was Parliament: standard Motown vocal R&B. Funkadelic was an acid rock band…Maggot Brain is as fine as albums come and Hazel’s guitar work on the title track is second to none. The height of the band — imo — was when Clinton managed to steal Bootsy and Maceo from James Brown. That period has the complex gospel vocals of Parliament mixed with the acid rock of Funkadelic and the pure funk of the JB’s. At a certain point, the band became something of a parody of itself…or maybe it was too much coke and LSD. Still, it’s hard to argue with ‘Return of the Intergalactic Doodoo Chasers”.

    Fela was actually pre-Boomer (being born in 1938), and even the Godfather of Soul gave him credit for the birth of funk. Big bands…though the total of 70 mostly being made with his multiple wives being on stage…lots of horns and the deepest Afrobeat funk grooves ever laid down.

    Try “Black Man’s Cry”, recorded in Germany in ’71 with Ginger Baker sitting on the drums:
    http://www.last.fm/music/Fela+Kuti/_/Black+Man%27s+Cry

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