CATEGORY: Health

Dr. Oz: New York Times and bogus “equal time” coverage of predator quack

Once again, the New York Times gives journalism a black eye with Oz coverage

Looking at this chronology of the NYT’s coverage of the Oz story really makes me wonder why they’re giving him a reach-around.

Here’s my summary of the coverage as extracted from the above linked search results:

  • April 16, 2015: Real doctors criticize quack (AP)
  • April 17, 2015: Mention of quack criticism in: Friday Briefing and New York Today: Stuffed
  • April 17, 2015: Oz defends (AP via ABC as I’ve reached my NYT limit before everything is paywalled)

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Love Food Glove

Love food glove

Some San Francisco street reality for your happy brunchy Sunday…

The fellow was clearly homeless, or pretty close to it. But it was a relief to see that at least in this one passing moment he had some food. It looked like a tamale of some kind. And he was really enjoying it. Devouring it, to the exclusion of his consideration of everything else around him as he walked the curb and gutter down Valencia Street.

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Book-Review

Book Review: Lost in the Darkness by William Mark

William Mark’s novel is a complex, sometimes convoluted, mix of abductions (both child and adult), sexual perversions, and rogue crusading that makes for a Mulligan stew of equal parts truth and lies, good and evil, and right and justice.

Another break from the 2015 reading list (next up, Sartre’s autobiography, The Words which I’m sure will be a fun romp) for a review of a new book sent me by my friends at Southern Yellow Pine Publishing. This one is a mixture of  genres, mystery, thriller, and crime fiction. It features the classic rogue cop, a beautiful, wealthy and slightly mysterious benefactress, an “A Team” motley crew of secretive, extra-legal crusading do-gooders (funded by that benefactress) whose mission is to find missing children and restore them to their parents, a nosy reporter whose ambition and unscrupulousness might expose the operation and wreck the lives of the crusaders and their benefactress, and, at the heart of the story, a missing child – the son of that rogue cop mentioned above – and a despicable sleazeball pervert of a politician.

As you might guess, unraveling this complicated skein of a yarn takes some time. Continue reading

Hillary announces, Progressives already getting thrown under bus

It’s not even damned if we do, damned if we don’t. It’s just damned.

Of course you’ve probably heard that Hillary has finally announced, on Twitter no less.

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Wrapping up Women’s History Month

Well, it is the last day of Women’s History Month so this is my final post in the series. If the reader will indulge me, I am feeling kind of reflective tonight.

About half of the posts I’ve done this month have been about things with which I was already familiar while the other half have been information that was new to me. I have felt a little bit frustrated about all the things I’d never heard of before. Even though I have a Women’s Studies concentration, there is still so very much I don’t know. This points to women’s erasure through his/story and that is what I have found frustrating. Continue reading

Woman-Power

For Women’s History Month – meet, and say good night to, Adrienne Rich

Fabulous feminist foremother Adrienne Rich has died at the age of eighty-two. I once went to a reading of hers. It was unforgettably powerful. I have read most of her books including her non-fiction “Of Woman Born.” I loved her and always will. She was brilliant. She was fierce. She was unapologetically feminist and unapologetically lesbian. From her New York Times obit tonight:

Adrienne Rich, a poet of towering reputation and towering rage, whose work — distinguished by an unswerving progressive vision and a dazzling, empathic ferocity — brought the oppression of women and lesbians to the forefront of poetic discourse and kept it there for nearly a half-century, died on Tuesday at her home in Santa Cruz, Calif. She was 82. Continue reading

end_patriarchy_design

Musings on the patriarchy 3/29/15 – gendered bombs, mutual outerspace penetration, and astronaut fetuses, part III

Part III of III. See part I and part II

Astronaut fetuses

I recently read that in the seventies, one Robert Byrn, a forty year old professor of criminal law at Fordham University, took it upon himself to represent in court all human fetuses between the fourth and twenty-fourth week of gestation scheduled to be aborted in New York City municipal hospitals. Byrn’s attorney, Thomas Ford, made the following amazing statement: “The fetus might well be described as an astronaut in a uterine spaceship.” Continue reading

CATEGORY: ArtSunday

Arnold Gingrich: a well tempered angler

“Actually, though being well read must be a part of the process, an angler is tempered chiefly by practice and experience, by learning and attempting to reach the successively higher goals of his sport, and thus acquiring, through any amount of disappointment and frustration, the satisfaction of knowing that he is doing the simplest thing in the hardest way possible.” – Arnold Gingrich

The Well-Tempered Angler by Arnold Gingrich. image courtesy librarything.com

A slight detour from my pursuit of world literature classics via the 2015 reading list. I’ve had a couple of gifts this past week, both from my son Josh. The first gift is a new granddaughter, Susanna Quinn, our first grandchild and a wondrous new addition to the life of this old writer/professor/musician. Of course, in that endeavor he had notable assistance from his lovely wife Sandra, so credit where credit is due.  The second gift Josh bestowed upon me was a book – you may let your shock and awe begin. We were on our way  to pick up some dinner the evening that the amazing and lovely Susanna was allowed to come home from the hospital and when I got into Josh’s car, there was a book in the floorboard. “Take that, Dad,” he said. “I’ve been meaning to give it to you.” It was a copy of The Well-Tempered Angler by Arnold Gingrich. Having just muddled my way through Andre Gide’s Corydon and just become a grandfather, I was feeling the need for something – shall we say, self-indulgent? The Well-Tempered Angler fit the bill perfectly.

The book is on fly fishing, my favorite sport.  I’ve written about fly fishing, on a number of occasions now. You can read this and this and this if you feel so inclined. I shall probably write about fly fishing again.

I think we have established that I have a certain fondness for fly fishing. So did Arnold Gingrich. For anyone who finds the literature of angling of any interest at all, or for those with a curiosity about how those of the New York literary scene lived back in the heady days of White, Thurber, and Parker at The New Yorker, and Hemingway and Fitzgerald at Esquire, the various sections of this book will be delightful.  Continue reading

CATEGORY: RaceGender

For Women’s History Month, meet Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak

Spivak’s introduction in Wikipedia:

Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak (born 24 February 1942) is an Indian literary theorist, philosopher and University Professor atColumbia University, where she is a founding member of the school’s Institute for Comparative Literature and Society. She is best known for the essay “Can the Subaltern Speak?” considered a founding text of postcolonialism; and for her translation of, and introduction to Jacques Derrida‘s De la grammatologie. In 2012 she was awarded the Kyoto Prize in Arts and Philosophy for being “a critical theorist and educator speaking for the humanities against intellectual colonialism in relation to the globalized world”. She received the Padma Bhushan, the third highest civilian award given by the Republic of India, in 2013.

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Woman-Power

Musings on the patriarchy, 3/28/15 – gendered bombs, mutual outerspace penetration, and astronaut fetuses, part II

This is part II in a series of III.  Part I, gendered bombs, here.

Mutual outerspace penetration

In July, 1975, the first international docking in space occurred involving the American Apollo and the Soviet Soyuz (meaning “union”). An official news release out of Houston, referring to the mating as “androgynous,” explained that the American ship played the “male / active role” on Thursday, July 17, by inserting its “nose” into the “nose” of the Russian ship. The press release further helpfully explained that the docking operation “was a purely male/female arrangement – a probe that fit snugly into a receptacle.” At the height of the militarism and mutually assured destruction that was the Cold War, however, neither country could be allowed to appear more “male” than the other. And so, the press release explained, on Friday, the Russian craft got to be the penetrator – ta-da, masculinity, understood as male-as-penetrator, preserved for both posturing nations. Continue reading

Woman-Power

For Women’s History Month – meet Judy Chicago

Of Judy Chicago, wikipedia gives the following introduction:

Judy Chicago (born Judith Sylvia Cohen; July 20, 1939 in Chicago, Illinois) is an American feminist artist, art educator, and writer known for her large collaborative art installation pieces which examine the role of women in history and culture. Born in Chicago, Illinois, as Judith Cohen, she changed her name after the death of her father and her first husband, choosing to disconnect from the idea of male dominated naming conventions. By the 1970s, Chicago had coined the term “feminist art” and had founded the first feminist art program in the United States. Chicago’s work incorporates stereotypical women’s artistic skills, such as needlework, counterbalanced with stereotypical male skills such as welding and pyrotechnics. Chicago’s masterpiece is The Dinner Party, which is in the collection of the Brooklyn Museum.

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CATEGORY: RaceGender

For Women’s History Month – meet Matilda Gage

I only just discovered one of the most fabulous feminist foremothers ever – Matilda Gage. And if I may be blunt about it, I am pretty fucking pissed off that I am only just discovering her. I am pissed off for two reasons.

One, I found her referenced by the contemporary writer Mary Daly. The degree to which Daly reintroduces ideas set forth by Gage more than a hundred years previously illustrates all too clearly how women are written out of his/story. With each generation, therefore, we are forced to reinvent the damn wheel. Continue reading

Woman-Power

For Women’s History Month, meet Sybil Luddington

She is called “the female Paul Revere.” She rode twice as far as Paul Revere, yet until recently had been largely forgotten by history.

Known for: If the stories we have of her ride are accurate, 16-year-old Sybil Luddington’s Connecticut ride to warn of an imminent attack on Danbury was about twice as long as Paul Revere’s ride. Her achievement and later service as a messenger reminds us that women had roles to play in the Revolutionary War.

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Fascinating

Leonard Nimoy is dead but Spock will endure, even in the constant fetid flow of forgettable celebrities and tabloid American pop-culture bullshit…

(Picture taken in Midtown Market, Brisbane, California on March 22nd, 2015. Live long and prosper.)

ArtSunday

Book Review: The Burgundy Briefcase by Roberta Burton

Knowledge in our chosen fields of endeavor is important, certainly…knowledge of ourselves is essential…. 

The Burgundy Briefcase by Roberta Burton (image courtesy Goodreads)

Roberta Burton’s The Burgundy Briefcase is a difficult novel to discuss because it doesn’t seem quite sure what sort of novel it wants to be. It’s part star-crossed love story, part therapeutic confessional, part self-examination. Its settings shift from place to place as its main character, a doctoral student named Lee Lindsey, moves around Tallahassee, Florida where she is completing her doctorate in marriage and family counseling at Florida State University. It moves, sometimes rather blithely, through time from present to past and back again. It has a shifting cast of characters who appear, disappear, and reappear in those weird ways that people sometimes do in life.

Perhaps The Burgundy Briefcase is best described as a picaresque novel about education. The work is filled with various types of educations, and Lee Lindsey, willingly and unwillingly, gets educated in all all of these education types. Continue reading

For Women’s History Month – books by American women that changed the world

The Yellow Wallpaper is especially important to me because I struggled greatly with depression and mental illness during four years of physical confinement within a very patriarchal marriage. Read it in full here. Also, Jane Addams is especially a hero of mine. She had so many pots boiling at once – I don’t know how she did it. I hope you will follow the link below and read more about her. Continue reading

Woman-Power

For Women’s History Month – women who have won the Nobel Peace Prize, part one

Women working for peace are always especially near and dear to my heart! Here are some winners of the Nobel Peace Prize. Since there are seventeen of them, I will present about half today and half tomorrow.

Oh, before I get to that though, I have to mention that Cindy Sheehan really is my peace activist hero. I was at Camp Casey with her where we camped out under the hot Texas sun just outside of George Bush’s ranch. Just as Camp Casey was winding down because Bush was leaving Texas and returning to D.C., Hurricane Katrina was bearing down on my beloved home city. Cindy and I did a press conference together in which I questioned whether the slow response to the disaster had anything to do with the fact that much of the Louisiana National Guard and much of its equipment were off fighting in a nation that had never attacked the United States. Continue reading