CATEGORY: ToR4bracket

Tournament of Rock IV FINALS: Duran Duran vs. Meat Loaf

In our second semi-final we have…no surprise whatsoever, as the Duranies just keep on coming. This time around they scored 85% of the vote to absolutely crush REO Speedwagon. We’ll see if they can now muster one final assault on Corporate Rock Mountain.

And don’t tell me you had unseeded Duran Duran and #10 seed Meat Loaf making the finals in your office pool, either. Nobody could have predicted this.

So, on with the show. Introducing first, at a combined weight of 587 pounds, hailing from Birmingham, England, DURAN DURAN!

Their opponent (you’re just waiting on a “combined weight” crack here, aren’t you? Stop it.), hailing from Big D, little a, double L A.S., MEAT LOAF!

Click to vote.

Here’s the up-to-date bracket.

CATEGORY: LeisureTravel2

Uganda Journal: a walk to the well

The well at Nakagongo sits in a low valley, with a web of trails that lead down to it from the surrounding hillsides. It’s not an especially grueling walk and not especially steep, but it’s a five-minute hike downhill from the road. On days like today, when it rained for a couple hours in the morning, the dirt path gets muddy. We also have to step over a pretty angry stream of ants.

Well01

About three hundred adults and eight hundred children are serviced by the well, which is nothing more than a clean natural spring surrounded by a cement basin. The basin seems to be draining well today–the water at the bottom is only ankle deep, although Deb has seen it back up almost to the output pipe. The ground around is a mucky mess.

Well02

Families have to walk from as far as forty-five minutes a day to collect water in five-gallon plastic containers. Once someone arrives, he or she might have to wait as long as half an hour before they have the chance to fill up. The villagers may then balance the jugs on their heads so they can carry jugs in each hand, too. Enterprising boys have set up a business where they’ll load their bikes with water and take them to the houses of people who can afford to pay for delivery.

At home, villagers use the water for cooking, cleaning, and bathing.

WaitingForWater

During the dry season, when the well dries up, villagers have to walk to another water source that’s an additional hour away.

To say I am thankful for indoor plumbing seems like a trite understatement. Seeing the well might be the most profound reminder of just how different life is for much of the world than it is for us in America and in other developed nations. This is everyday life for these villagers, and yet it is so far removed from my own life that it might well as be a different century or a different planet as a different continent and country.

Certainly America has its share of drought–I think of the summer of 2011 when much of the cornbelt baked–but water generally flows pretty freely…at least freely enough that most of us still take it for granted, although climatologists could offer some disheartening insight into that, I’m sure. I can walk into three rooms in my home that have running water, and that’s not counting the baseboard heat I have. Some of these people have to walk for forty-five minutes.

Think about that when you turn on the tap.