Woman-Power

For Women’s History Month, meet Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak

Spivak’s introduction in Wikipedia:

Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak (born 24 February 1942) is an Indian literary theorist, philosopher and University Professor atColumbia University, where she is a founding member of the school’s Institute for Comparative Literature and Society. She is best known for the essay “Can the Subaltern Speak?” considered a founding text of postcolonialism; and for her translation of, and introduction to Jacques Derrida‘s De la grammatologie. In 2012 she was awarded the Kyoto Prize in Arts and Philosophy for being “a critical theorist and educator speaking for the humanities against intellectual colonialism in relation to the globalized world”. She received the Padma Bhushan, the third highest civilian award given by the Republic of India, in 2013.

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Woman-Power

Musings on the patriarchy, 3/28/15 – gendered bombs, mutual outerspace penetration, and astronaut fetuses, part II

This is part II in a series of III.  Part I, gendered bombs, here.

Mutual outerspace penetration

In July, 1975, the first international docking in space occurred involving the American Apollo and the Soviet Soyuz (meaning “union”). An official news release out of Houston, referring to the mating as “androgynous,” explained that the American ship played the “male / active role” on Thursday, July 17, by inserting its “nose” into the “nose” of the Russian ship. The press release further helpfully explained that the docking operation “was a purely male/female arrangement – a probe that fit snugly into a receptacle.” At the height of the militarism and mutually assured destruction that was the Cold War, however, neither country could be allowed to appear more “male” than the other. And so, the press release explained, on Friday, the Russian craft got to be the penetrator – ta-da, masculinity, understood as male-as-penetrator, preserved for both posturing nations. Continue reading

Tournament of Rock: Big Head Todd & the Monsters vs Munly

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In the final match of round #3, Snake Rattle Rattle Snake thrashed Tennis and advances to the next round.

Here are the randomly drawn pairings for the quarterfinals, courtesy of Random.org.

Big Head Todd and the Monsters
Munly

The Samples
Space Team Electra

The Lumineers
Snake Rattle Rattle Snake

Firefall
Fiction 8

 And away we go.

Our first Great Eight match features one of Colorado’s most enduringly popular bands vs one of its most aggressively unconventional. Continue reading

Woman-Power

For Women’s History Month, meet Hatshepsut

Wikipedia introduces Hatshepsut as follows:

Hatshepsut (/hætˈʃɛpsʊt/; also Hatchepsut; meaning Foremost of Noble Ladies; 1508–1458 BC) was the fifth pharaoh of the Eighteenth dynasty of Egypt. Hatshepsut came to the throne of Egypt in 1478 BC. Officially, she ruled jointly with Thutmose III who had ascended to the throne as a child one year earlier. Hatshepsut was the chief wife of Thutmose II, Thutmose III’s father. She is generally regarded by Egyptologists as one of the most successful pharaohs, reigning longer than any other woman of an indigenous Egyptian dynasty. According to Egyptologist James Henry Breasted she is also known as “the first great woman in history of whom we are informed.”

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Woman-Power

For Women’s History Month – meet Judy Chicago

Of Judy Chicago, wikipedia gives the following introduction:

Judy Chicago (born Judith Sylvia Cohen; July 20, 1939 in Chicago, Illinois) is an American feminist artist, art educator, and writer known for her large collaborative art installation pieces which examine the role of women in history and culture. Born in Chicago, Illinois, as Judith Cohen, she changed her name after the death of her father and her first husband, choosing to disconnect from the idea of male dominated naming conventions. By the 1970s, Chicago had coined the term “feminist art” and had founded the first feminist art program in the United States. Chicago’s work incorporates stereotypical women’s artistic skills, such as needlework, counterbalanced with stereotypical male skills such as welding and pyrotechnics. Chicago’s masterpiece is The Dinner Party, which is in the collection of the Brooklyn Museum.

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CATEGORY: RaceGender

For Women’s History Month – meet Matilda Gage

I only just discovered one of the most fabulous feminist foremothers ever – Matilda Gage. And if I may be blunt about it, I am pretty fucking pissed off that I am only just discovering her. I am pissed off for two reasons.

One, I found her referenced by the contemporary writer Mary Daly. The degree to which Daly reintroduces ideas set forth by Gage more than a hundred years previously illustrates all too clearly how women are written out of his/story. With each generation, therefore, we are forced to reinvent the damn wheel. Continue reading

Woman-Power

For Women’s History Month, meet Sybil Luddington

She is called “the female Paul Revere.” She rode twice as far as Paul Revere, yet until recently had been largely forgotten by history.

Known for: If the stories we have of her ride are accurate, 16-year-old Sybil Luddington’s Connecticut ride to warn of an imminent attack on Danbury was about twice as long as Paul Revere’s ride. Her achievement and later service as a messenger reminds us that women had roles to play in the Revolutionary War.

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Fascinating

Leonard Nimoy is dead but Spock will endure, even in the constant fetid flow of forgettable celebrities and tabloid American pop-culture bullshit…

(Picture taken in Midtown Market, Brisbane, California on March 22nd, 2015. Live long and prosper.)

Tournament of Rock: The 5280 – The Lumineers vs. The Denver Gentlemen

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In Match #6, Munly nipped Wovenhand and advances to the next round.

Our seventh second-r0und pairing presents us with two bands working in the Folk mine. They’re on opposite ends of the mine, to be sure, and our readers are sure to find interesting points of contrast as they consider the dark genesis of the Denver Sound and the wildly popular darlings of the neo-Folk scene. Continue reading

ArtSunday

Book Review: The Burgundy Briefcase by Roberta Burton

Knowledge in our chosen fields of endeavor is important, certainly…knowledge of ourselves is essential…. 

The Burgundy Briefcase by Roberta Burton (image courtesy Goodreads)

Roberta Burton’s The Burgundy Briefcase is a difficult novel to discuss because it doesn’t seem quite sure what sort of novel it wants to be. It’s part star-crossed love story, part therapeutic confessional, part self-examination. Its settings shift from place to place as its main character, a doctoral student named Lee Lindsey, moves around Tallahassee, Florida where she is completing her doctorate in marriage and family counseling at Florida State University. It moves, sometimes rather blithely, through time from present to past and back again. It has a shifting cast of characters who appear, disappear, and reappear in those weird ways that people sometimes do in life.

Perhaps The Burgundy Briefcase is best described as a picaresque novel about education. The work is filled with various types of educations, and Lee Lindsey, willingly and unwillingly, gets educated in all all of these education types. Continue reading

Business

TTP: fast-track disaster ahead

The Trans-Pacific Partnership is the opposite of free trade

Like many, I have my share of disappointments with Obama. On balance, he’s infinitely preferable to any of the plausible Republican alternatives—can you imagine what Mitt Romney or John McCain and a Republican Congress would be getting up to these days? Still, there are areas—global warming in particular—where I wish he had been more aggressive. I fully concede the limits of what may have been possible throughout his term, given the implacable opposition he has been facing. But still, it would have been good to see a more deliberate attempt to change the trajectory of things.

The ongoing corporatization of nearly everything would have been another place to start. I suppose the failure to pursue the banks aggressively should have been a tip-off that the Clinton financial people were still running the show. Plus the Obama administration’s unwillingness to try to put Elizabeth Warren as head of her brainchild, the new (and pretty efficient, I gather) Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (although she has had her payback.) When people start telling me that there’s no real difference between the two parties, in the finance area I tend to agree, with some notable exceptions like Warren. Continue reading